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Cosmetics, Styles & Beauty Concepts in Iran & Mesopotamia 
The use of cosmetics is documented to have begun  around 10,000 BC;  however, the bulk of our information comes from around 3,000  BC from  the written records of the ancient Mesopotamian and Egyptian texts and   artifacts. These ancient people were a lot more at ease with their  bodies and  sexuality compared to the later periods. Both males and  females used make-up,  had long or short hair as they desired, wore  jewelry, coloured their body parts  and dressed elaborately and  colourfully. Men had no problems wearing skirts and  fashion and style  was not used to emphasis marked gender differences. However,  it did  distinguish class and status. Body was used freely and sexuality was   often perceived as a gift from gods and goddesses and was celebrated.  Judging  by the number of nude male and female attendants and  personalities depicted,  nudity did not seem to be a problem. However,  high-ranking females would not  expose their bodies as much as the  ordinary females did as a sign of their high  status.
Scented oils and ointments  were used by this time to  clean and soften the skin and mask the body  odor. Dyes and natural paint was  used to colour the face, mainly for  ceremonial and religious occasions. Rich  people applied minerals to  their faces, skin (Iranians use roshoor) and used  oiled-based perfumes  in their bath.

Cosmetics, Styles & Beauty Concepts in Iran & Mesopotamia

The use of cosmetics is documented to have begun around 10,000 BC; however, the bulk of our information comes from around 3,000 BC from the written records of the ancient Mesopotamian and Egyptian texts and artifacts. These ancient people were a lot more at ease with their bodies and sexuality compared to the later periods. Both males and females used make-up, had long or short hair as they desired, wore jewelry, coloured their body parts and dressed elaborately and colourfully. Men had no problems wearing skirts and fashion and style was not used to emphasis marked gender differences. However, it did distinguish class and status. Body was used freely and sexuality was often perceived as a gift from gods and goddesses and was celebrated. Judging by the number of nude male and female attendants and personalities depicted, nudity did not seem to be a problem. However, high-ranking females would not expose their bodies as much as the ordinary females did as a sign of their high status.

Scented oils and ointments were used by this time to clean and soften the skin and mask the body odor. Dyes and natural paint was used to colour the face, mainly for ceremonial and religious occasions. Rich people applied minerals to their faces, skin (Iranians use roshoor) and used oiled-based perfumes in their bath.

  1. coffeekatten posted this